Tag Archives: In Case You Missed It

Early Behavior Therapy Found to Aid Children With A.D.H.D., Free Play vs. Competition, 8 Habits That Make Millennials Stressed, Anxious And Unproductive, And more In Case You Missed It– February 22nd, 2016

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we look at early behavior therapy aiding children with A.D.H.D., free play vs. competition, 8 habits that make millennials stressed, anxious and unproductive, and more.

Early Behavior Therapy Found to Aid Children With A.D.H.D. The New York Times

Experts believe that the efficacy of early behavioral therapy, if replicated in larger studies, could change standard medical practice for children and adolescents in the United States with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or A.D.H.D. New research, published in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, found that children who started with behavioral modification did significantly better than those who began with medication by the end, no matter what treatment combination they ended up with. Beginning treatment for children with A.D.H.D with behavioral treatment and following with medication, if needed, was found to cost an average of $700 less annually per child.

Free Play vs. Competition – The Huffington Post

The current American work culture is riddled with people who use the competitive mindset and immediately thrust themselves into working hard. But this causes burnout and some psychological trauma. The American Psychological Association found the current millennial generation to be the most stressed in record. However, free play may be the new way of doing business, by using our imagination, having no objective, and pursuing whatever comes to mind. Both competitive spirit and innovation are important, but we have become very regimented and competition oriented. When we are in a state of free play, we are able to be more innovative, anyone can put their nose to the grindstone and do arithmetic, but it takes real innovation to take a world-changing concept and turn it into reality.

8 Habits That Make Millennials Stressed, Anxious and Unproductive – Forbes

The American Psychological Association (APA) has found that millennials experience more stress and are less able to manage it than any other generation. The APA reports that 12% of millennials have a diagnosed anxiety disorder, 30% of working millennials have general anxiety, and anxiety regularly afflicts 61% of college students. Sources of millennial anxiety include a tough job market, student debt, ambition addiction, career crises and choice-overload. Chronic anxiety is not sustainable, however by swapping out some daily practices, millennials can improve their moods and their lives one habit at a time.

Let’s Change the Conversation Around Mental Health – The Huffington Post

The stigma around mental health often prevents people who need help from seeking it. First Lady Michelle Obama believes we shouldn’t treat mental health conditions any differently. “Instead, we should make it clear that getting help isn’t a sign of weakness – it’s a sign of strength – and we should ensure that people can get the treatment they need”. The Affordable Care Act expanded mental health and substance use disorder benefits and required new plans to cover depression screenings for adults and behavioral assessments for kids. FLOTUS wants us find the courage to reach out and have tough conversations with our friends and family members — and get help. She notes that we need to recognize that mental health is important.

What do you think of these stories? What did we leave out? 

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We’re Lucky If We Get to Be Old, Scientists Move Closer to Understanding Schizophrenia’s Cause, For Older Adults Serious Depression Symptoms Increase Risk for Stroke and Heart Disease, and more – In Case You Missed It – February 5th, 2016

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we look at why we may be lucky if we get to be old, scientists getting closer to understanding schizophrenia’s cause, for older adults serious depression symptoms increase risk for stroke and heart disease and more.

We’re lucky if we get to be old, physician and professor believes The Washington Post

Dr. Bill Thomas, a geriatrician and theater performer is traveling the country trying to change people’s attitudes about aging. In an age of Botox and celebrity teenagers, old age is not an easy sell and something to be feared. Dr. Thomas believes the correct message is that we are lucky if we get to grow old, this “third” phase of life beyond adulthood that can be as rich and rewarding. He argues, the goal is “normalizing the entire lifespan instead of separating and stigmatizing one part as something different.” Research has shown that people with negative conceptions of aging are more likely to experience dementia later in life. Dr. Thomas argues that maybe it is time to challenge the status quo.

Scientists Move Closer to Understanding Schizophrenia’s Cause – The New York Times

Scientists have taken a significant step toward understanding the cause of schizophrenia; a new study provides the first rigorously tested insight into the biology behind any common psychiatric disorder. The findings, published in the journal Nature, provide researchers with their first biological handle on schizophrenia. The findings also help to explain some other mysteries, including why the disorder often begins in adolescence or young adulthood. Eric S. Lander, the director of the Broad Institute said “We’re all very excited and proud of this work, but I’m not ready to call it a victory until we have something that can help patients.”

American Geriatrics Society Exclusive – For older adults, serious depression symptoms increase risk for stroke and heart disease

A new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society sheds light on whether depression or its symptoms affect heart disease and stroke in older adults. The researchers discovered that adults 65 years and older who had high levels of depressive symptoms during the study were at greater risk of experiencing heart disease or stroke events over the course of the study. This supported the researchers’ hypothesis that depression could be a risk factor for heart disease or stroke.

Middle school: The new high school for moms – CNN

A new study published in the journal, Developmental Psychology, by Arizona State University researchers, shows the most stressful time for moms is middle school. Results showed that across the board, mothers of only middle-school-age children reported the highest levels of stress, loneliness, emptiness, and the lowest levels of life satisfaction and fulfillment. Cynthia Tobias, co-author of the book “Middle School: The Inside Story: What Kids Tell Us, But Don’t Tell You” believes the biggest conflicts come when parents don’t realize their children are starting to see themselves as young adults and don’t respond accordingly. Suniya Luthar, professor of psychology at Arizona State University and lead researcher, urges mothers to reach out to other moms of middle-schoolers for support, she says “It’s not ‘it takes a village to raise a child.’ It takes a village to raise a preteen.”

What do you think of these stories? What did we leave out?

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 Moreover, don’t forget to follow us on social media:

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Copyright 2015 American Psychological Association


Filed under: In Case You Missed It Tagged: aging, mental health, parenting

Are the Mentally Ill Being Unfairly Targeted by the FBI’s Gun List? The Mysterious Link Between Autism and Extraordinary Abilities, “Midlife Crisis Is Just a Myth.” In Case You Missed It– January 20th, 2016

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address whether the mentally ill are being unfairly targeted by the FBI’s gun list, the mysterious link between autism and extraordinary abilities, and whether the midlife crisis is just a myth.

Are the mentally ill being unfairly targeted by the FBI’s gun list? The Washington Post

A new rule from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) makes it clear that health agencies and medical facilities can report the names of certain people to the federal database without violating privacy laws.  Some advocates believe this unfairly targets the mentally ill, who are more often the victims, not perpetrators, of gun violence. The White House is also pushing to allow the Social Security Administration to share information with the FBI about individuals with mental health issues who are determined to be legally incompetent. Advocates worry that this proposal is overly broad.

The Mysterious Link between Autism and Extraordinary Abilities – The Atlantic

Doctors have noticed that some types of brain injury or dysfunction in the left hemisphere may be related to compensatory improvement in typically right-hemisphere functions. The brain may be redeploying its resources so that regions engaged for one purpose are recruited to take on more advanced tasks to compensate for damages in another area. San Diego psychologist Dr. Bernard Rimland noticed that savant skills, such as artistic expression or the ability to mentally manipulate three-dimensional (3-D) objects, were most frequently right-hemisphere faculties. Dr. Bruce Miller, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Francisco, believes enhanced perception may contribute to logical ability, which might explain the superior skill of some people with autism in solving complex logical puzzles.

“Midlife crisis is just a myth.” — Study – The Science Times

A team from the University of Alberta in Canada concluded that the midlife crisis is nothing other than a myth. This study published in the American Psychological Association’s journal, Developmental Psychology, presented data that showed participants registered a higher level of happiness at 40 than when they were 18. The level of happiness increased when the participants were between the ages 18 and early 30s, and some said their happiness were low when they get preoccupied with jobs. However, most achieved their maximum happiness after they got married and had better physical condition. Dr. Nancy Galambos pointed out that younger people may have a harder life than the older ones who already got their lives organized.

What do you think of these stories? What did we leave out?

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For more In Case, You Missed It,  go to our homepage and subscribe to our blog via RSS or email.

Moreover, don’t forget to follow us on social media:

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Copyright 2015 American Psychological Association


Filed under: In Case You Missed It Tagged: discrimination, gun control, mental health, public policy

How to Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions, Seeking the Gears of Our Inner Clock, The Real Victims of Victimhood and more- In Case You Missed It– January 8th, 2015

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address how to keep your New Year’s resolutions, seeking the gears of our inner clock, the real victims of victimhood, and more.

How to Keep Your New Year’s Resolutions – Time Magazine

The New Year is a time when many people begin their resolutions, but according to psychologist Art Markman, if you want to succeed with your New Year’s resolutions, you have to start way before New Year’s Eve to get ready. The reason that people fail to accomplish most of their resolutions is that they don’t put in enough effort to allow them to succeed. Some other simple rules to follow to keep your resolutions this year are: Focus on positive goals rather than negative ones, make realistic plans, and make changes to your environment. People really can succeed with their New Year’s resolutions, they just need to plan ahead.

Seeking the Gears of Our Inner Clock– The New York Times

The body’s circadian clock influences our sleeping habits, body temperature, the production of hormones, and our thoughts and feelings. Psychologists have had people take cognitive tests at different times of day in order to measure some of its effects on the brain. Results of these testing have shown that, late morning turns out to be the best time to try doing tasks such as mental arithmetic while later in the afternoon is the time to attempt simpler tasks. Examining the brains of healthy people who had died suddenly, neuroscientist Huda Akil and colleagues found many genes that followed a consistent daily cycle, so consistent she could predict time of death to within an hour. Neuroscientist Colleen A. McClung did a study to examine the patterns of gene expression in the brains of young and old people and discovered genes that became active in daily cycles only in old age. Dr. McClung believes that “It looks like the brain might be trying to compensate by turning on an additional clock.” Switching on this backup clock may be a possible treatment to a range of circadian-related disorders.

The Real Victims of Victimhood – The New York Times

Are we becoming a culture of victimhood? In 2014 a Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences study concluded that there was a widespread political “motive attribution asymmetry,” in which both sides attributed their own group’s aggressive behavior to love, but the opposite side’s to hatred. Victimhood makes it more difficult to resolve political and social conflicts. Victimhood culture feeds on a mentality that every policy difference is a battle between good (us) and evil (them). Victimhood culture generally claims the right to say who is and is not allowed to speak to protect the sensibilities of its advocates. Leaders in victimhood culture treat people less as individuals and more as aggrieved masses.

APA Exclusive- Self-Esteem Gender Gap More Pronounced in Western Countries

A study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that self-esteem tended to increase from adolescence to adulthood, and that men at every age tended to have higher levels of self-esteem than women worldwide. When they broke the results down by country, they found that this self-esteem gender gap is more pronounced in Western industrialized countries. What surprised researchers was, despite cultural differences, the general trend across all the countries suggests that gender and age differences in self-esteem are not a Western idiosyncrasy, but can be observed in different cultures across the world. Lead author Wiebke Bleidorn, PhD commented that this finding “refines our understanding of how cultural forces may shape self-esteem, which, when worked out more fully, can help inform self-esteem theory and design interventions to promote or protect self-esteem.”

What do you think of these stories? What did we leave out?

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For more In Case, You Missed It,  go to our homepage and subscribe to our blog via RSS or email.

Moreover, don’t forget to follow us on social media:

You can follow APA Public Interest on Twitter – @APAPublicInt and Instagram – APAPubInt.

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Make sure to also check out these APA publications:

Copyright 2015 American Psychological Association


Filed under: In Case You Missed It Tagged: mental health, public policy

New KFF/CNN Survey on Race, Covering Transgender Care Is Good Economics for Insurance Companies, Making Sense of the Senseless Violence, Too Much TV and Chill Could Reduce Brain Power Over Time and more- In Case You Missed It– December 8th, 2015

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health, and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address a new KFF/CNN survey on race, how covering transgender care is good economics for insurance companies, making sense of the senseless violence, too much TV and chill could reduce brain power over time, and more. 

New KFF/CNN Survey on Race Finds Deep Divisions in How Blacks, Whites and Hispanics Experience and View Race Relations, Discrimination and the Police – The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

With racial incidents and concerns continuing to make national headlines, a new Kaiser Family Foundation/CNN Survey of Americans on Race probes deeply into the views and experiences of Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites, including their personal experiences with discrimination. The survey captures both similarities and differences in how people of different races view race relations, the criminal justice system, incidents of police violence against Blacks, and the Black Lives Matter movement. It also explores their experiences on racial issues and the dramatic differences in the ways people of different races view them. CNN is featuring the poll’s findings on air and across its digital platforms. A Foundation report summarizes the poll’s findings and provides the detailed question-by-question results.

Covering Transgender Care Is Good Economics for Insurance Companies– The Atlantic

While some health insurance companies are starting to pay for gender-reassignment surgery and hormone therapy, a majority of them still do not. The American College of Physicians, the American Medical Association, and the American Psychological Association are just a few organizations that consider gender-transition services to be medically necessary for transgender people. Treatments like gender-reassignment surgery and hormone therapy are an investment in reducing future health expenses. William Padula, at Johns Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health, looks at the cost-effectiveness of transgender health care.  He found that “coverage is of really good value and it’s a low-budget impact for society from an insurance standpoint.” His view?  Health insurances companies can absolutely afford to cover the health concerns of transgender people

Making Sense of the Senseless Violence– U.S. News & World Report

Mass shootings have become a regular part of life in America. Mental health experts warn that this exposure to violence may have some major consequences for the nation. Americans are left numb by the constant exposure to violence, which according to psychotherapist Jonathan Alpert, is a normal reaction. APA Fellow Russell Jones, PhD says “people can become very fearful and apprehensive,” some people have become more isolated as they continue to be exposed to constant violence. Dr. Renee Binder, President of the American Psychiatric Association, believes there are steps that can be taken to cope. These steps include reassuring your children that they are safe and creating an open and safe space to talk about these issues with your children. APA has tips for talking to kids about difficult news and disasters.

Too Much TV and Chill Could Reduce Brain Power Over Time – NPR

According to a study at the University of California, San Francisco, published in JAMA Psychiatry, people who get little exercise or watch at least 3 hours of TV a day do worse on tests measuring cognitive focus and speed. Marcus Richards, a psychologist at the University College London, says it’s reasonable to think the gap in cognitive function between high-volume TV watchers and infrequent watchers might widen over the years. For some, the early decline in cognitive functioning could become serious later in life.

What do you think of these stories? What did we leave out?

Leave us a comment.

For more In Case, You Missed It,  go to our homepage and subscribe to our blog via RSS or email.

Moreover, don’t forget to follow us on social media:

You can follow APA Public Interest on Twitter – @APAPublicInt and Instagram – APAPubInt.

You can also follow APA on Twitter (@APA) and Facebook.

Make sure to also check out these APA publications:

Copyright 2015 American Psychological Association


Filed under: Culture, Culture, Ethnicity and Race, Ethnicity and Race, In Case You Missed It, LGBT Issues, Uncategorized Tagged: discrimination, race, transgender

Utah Judge Drops Order on Lesbians’ Foster Child, Black Students Around U.S. Complain of Casual Everyday Racism, Hating Muslims Plays Right into the Islamic State’s Hands and More- In Case You Missed It– November 19th, 2015

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address a Utah judge’s orders about a foster child place with a lesbian couple, black students around U.S. complain of casual everyday racism, hating Muslims plays right into the Islamic State’s hands and more. 

 

Utah Judge Drops Order on Lesbians’ Foster Child– The New York Times

After ordering that a foster child be taken away from a lesbian couple because it was “not in the best interest of children to be raised by same-sex couples,” Utah Judge Scott N. Johansen reversed his decision — at least temporarily – under pressure from gay rights advocates and Utah’s Republican governor.  In the view of gay rights advocates, the Supreme Court’s decision in Obergefell v. Hodges should have put this question to rest, as the right to marry confers the same rights that other married couples have.  APA filed an amicus brief in this case, and applauded the Supreme Court’s ruling.  Judge Johansen subsequently recused himself from the case amid calls for his impeachment.

Black Students Around U.S. Complain of Casual, Everyday Racism– CBS News

Last week, University of Missouri President Tim Wolfe resigned amid protests by the football team and other students that the university was indifferent to repeated complaints about ongoing racial slurs and other racist behavior directed toward Black students.  Protests spread to other universities across the U.S., with students complaining of “casual, everyday racism.”  In this CBS News article, we hear from Sheryce Holloway, who is tired of White people at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond asking if they can touch her hair, or if she knows the latest dance move; and from Dominick Hall at Chicago’s Loyola University, who sees groups of White guys stop talking when he walks by and some people grabbing their bags tighter.  These were among thousands of students across the country taking part in campus demonstrations, talking not only about explicit racism but about subtler expressions of prejudice.  Many say they face these “microaggressions” daily.  For more on microaggressions, check out posts here, on the Public Interest blog.

Hating Muslims Plays Right into the Islamic State’s Hands – The Washington Post

Following the horrific attacks in Paris this past Friday night, there has been an uptick in anti-Muslim violence, with mosques, kebab restaurants, and halal butcher shops being targeted, and anti-Muslim protests.  Similar anti-Muslim violence and vandalism followed the Charlie Hedbo attacks in January.  Psychologist Arie Kruglanski, who studies how people become terrorists, commented, “This is precisely what ISIS was aiming for — to provoke communities to commit actions against Muslims.  Then ISIS will be able to say, ‘I told you so. These are your enemies, and the enemies of Islam.’”  Some counterterrorism experts believe that Islamist militants intend to make Muslims in the West feel isolated and turn against their own communities.

Overweight Men, Not Just Women, Face Daily Discrimination – Zee News

In a study published in APA’s Journal of Applied Psychology, non-overweight men applied for jobs at retail stores or went shopping, and then donned overweight prosthetics and did the same thing, at different stores. According to Dr. Enrica Ruggs, one of the researchers, the men in overweight prosthetics experienced more discrimination, for example: “Employees they interacted with would try to end the interaction early, there was less affirmative behavior like less nodding or smiling; there was more avoidance types of behavior like frowning and trying to get out of the interaction.”  These findings suggest that men who are overweight experience more discrimination than men who are not, which is a pattern similar to that for women.

What do you think of these stories? What did we leave out?

Leave us a comment.

For more In Case, You Missed It,  go to our homepage and subscribe to our blog via RSS or email. 

Moreover, don’t forget to follow us on social media:
You can follow APA Public Interest on Twitter – @APAPublicInt and Instagram – APAPubInt.

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Make sure to also check out these APA publications:

Copyright 2015 American Psychological Association


Filed under: Culture, Ethnicity and Race, Ethnicity and Race, In Case You Missed It, LGBT Issues, Uncategorized

The time is now for mental health reform, Every Day, In All-Gender Restrooms: the Signs Reflect the Times and more- In Case You Missed It– November 9th, 2015

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address the time is now for mental health reform, in all-gender restrooms: the signs reflect the times and more.

The time is now for mental health reform- The Washington Times

More than 13 million Americans have schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression, and the majority of them are going without treatment. A patchwork of programs and policies spanning numerous federal and state agencies makes the task of managing mental illness challenging for physicians, providers, patients and their families. This is complicated by fragmented delivery and reimbursement systems that disregard parity laws, regulatory barriers, workforce shortages and the enduring stigma surrounding mental health. A House Energy and Commerce subcommittee is scheduled to markup the Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act. This legislation would comprehensively address the issues faced by people with serious mental illness, as well as the 60 million Americans who live with another form of mental health or substance use disorder. Mental health reform would be a great accomplishment for Congress and the American public.

Every Student, Every Day – U.S. Department of Education

In response to the President’s call to action to improve the lives of all young people through the My Brother’s Keeper Initiative (MBK), the Obama Administration is launched on October 7, 2015, Every Student, Every Day: A National Initiative to Address and Eliminate Chronic Absenteeism. Every Student, Every Day is focused on the estimated 5 to 7.5 million students who are chronically absent each year. Chronic absenteeism puts students at heightened risk of falling behind and dropping out of school. Despite record high school graduation rates, too many of our nation’s young people—particularly students who are low-income, of color, homeless, highly mobile, with disabilities, and/or juvenile justice-involved—still do not graduate from high school or are off-track toward that important goal. This initiative will empower educators and communities to close the opportunity gap facing our most vulnerable children and ensure there’s a student at every school desk, every day,” said U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro.

In All-Gender Restrooms, the Signs Reflect the Times – The New York Times

The Whitney Museum of American Art moved to its new location in Lower Manhattan, which provides restrooms for everyone on the gender spectrum. The Whitney is not alone in being challenged to rethink one of the most basic uses of public space. With the issues of serving openly in the military and same-sex marriage now largely resolved, the fight for all-gender restrooms has emerged as the latest civil rights issue in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (L.G.B.T.) community. Ever since their introduction, restrooms have been a curious ground zero for civil rights, whether for African-Americans or people with disabilities. Schools and universities (including Johns Hopkins and Michigan State), museums (like the American Folk Art Museum in New York City and the Utah Museum of Fine Arts in Salt Lake City), restaurants both trendy and modest (such as the Pass & Provisions in Houston and the Midtown Cafe in Santa Cruz, Calif.) and even the White House (in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building) are recasting the traditional men’s/women’s room, resulting in a dizzying range of (often creative) signage and vocabulary.

APA Exclusive– All-gender restrooms were made available during the 2014 and 2015 APA Conventions and will continue to be provided at future APA Conventions. They will also be provided at the spring and fall consolidated meetings of APA Boards and Committees.

What do you think of these stories? What did we leave out?

Leave us a comment.

For more In Case, You Missed It,  go to our homepage and subscribe to our blog via RSS or email.

Moreover, don’t forget to follow us on social media:
You can follow APA Public Interest on Twitter – @APAPublicInt and Instagram – APAPubInt.

You can also follow APA on Twitter (@APA) and Facebook.

Make sure to also check out these APA publications:

 Copyright 2015 American Psychological Association


Filed under: In Case You Missed It Tagged: advocacy, Children, children's mental health, culture, discrimination

Weight and exercise may affect children’s thinking skills, Alzheimer’s link leads to more financial planning, Migrant children: arriving alone and frightened and more- In Case You Missed It– November 2, 2015

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address the impact of weight and exercise on children’s thinking skills, Alzheimer’s link leads to more financial planning, migrant children: arriving alone and frightened and more. 

Weight, Exercise May Affect Children’s Thinking Skills-U.S. News & World Report

Children’s weight and physical activity levels may affect their thinking and learning skills, according to a study just out in Pediatric Exercise Science. Researchers studied 45 normal-weight children, aged 7 to 11; 24 of them were active and the rest were not. Researchers found that normal-weight active children did better on tests of mental skills — such as planning and paying attention — than their inactive counterparts. This association between physical activity and mental skills in children is not necessarily a cause-and-effect relationship. As Catherine Davis, a clinical health psychologist, commented, the good news is that children — with the help of families and schools – may be able to improve thinking skills by boosting their physical activity levels.

Alzheimer’s Link Leads to More Financial Planning -The Wall Street Journal

A forthcoming study from professors at the University of Utah says people whose families have a history of Alzheimer’s disease are much more likely to seek expert financial advice and are more likely to delay retirement, compared with people for whom Alzheimer’s isn’t an issue. Cost concerns arising from Alzheimer’s disease, which can require years of institutionalized care, are pushing individuals to plan more. The study, which has been submitted to American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease & Other Dementias, notes that care for Alzheimer’s patients is costing the patients or their families’ on average $56,290 a year, based on data from 2010. The number of Alzheimer’s patients, meanwhile, is expected to triple to 13.8 million by 2050.  Cathleen Zick, a professor of family and consumer studies at the University of Utah and one of three authors of the study, says everyone needs a realistic estimate of what they will need for retirement and a plan to help them meet those needs—especially people with potentially serious health concerns.

Migrant Children, Arriving Alone and Frightened– The New York times

Last year, more than 23,000 unaccompanied minors applied for asylum in the 28 member countries of the European Union, according to the United Nations. That was before the number of refugees surged this year. By now, 30,000 are estimated to live in Germany alone. Two dozen psychological profiles of recent arrivals provide indications that many of Europe’s new mystery children are boys ages 14 to 17, sent by families too poor to pay smugglers for more than a single journey. Some lost their parents to war or murder at home. A few were escaping recruitment as child soldiers or suicide bombers. Only about 2 percent of the teenagers who arrive alone are girls, but they often have the most harrowing tales of abuse. In a separate headquarters, with a 2-million-euro budget and a staff of 25, workers who used to protect neglected and abused children from drug-addicted parents and domestic violence now spend their days finding foster families, homes, psychological support, legal guardians and schools for the young Syrian, Afghan and Somali arrivals. The numbers are now so large that everything is scarce.

The Hidden Stigma In The Talk Therapy And Schizophrenia Study– Forbes

The good news is:  A just published study found that talk therapy benefits patients experiencing their first episode of psychosis. Thirty-four clinics in 21 states treated patients suffering from a first-episode psychosis with a “comprehensive” program rather than usual community care. But even in this study, stigma may be evident. The clinicians doing the work, according to a 2014 presentation by Dr. John M. Kane, the lead researcher on the study, “have at least Bachelor’s level education and prior clinical experience,” compared with master’s or doctoral level clinicians in other settings.  The impact of level of training and expertise on outcomes is a question we should look at.

What do you think of these stories? What did we leave out?

Leave us a comment.

For more In Case, You Missed It, go to our homepage and subscribe to our blog via RSS or email.

 

Moreover, don’t forget to follow us on social media:
You can follow APA Public Interest on Twitter – @APAPublicInt and Instagram – APAPubInt.

You can also follow APA on Twitter (@APA) and Facebook.

Make sure to also check out these APA publications:

In the Public Interest – the Public Interest Directorate’s monthly newsletter.

Copyright 2015 American Psychological Association


Filed under: In Case You Missed It Tagged: aging, bullying, Children, children's mental health

Our High School Kids: Tired, Stressed and Bored, Bullied Teens Face Roadblocks to Mental Health Services, Why What You Learned in Preschool Is Crucial at Work and more- In Case You Missed It– October 29, 2015

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address the impact of our high school kids: tired, stressed and bored, bullied teens face roadblocks to mental health services, why what you learned in preschool is crucial at work and more. 

Our high school kids: tired, stressed and bored– USA Today

New survey findings suggest that U.S. high school students consistently invoke three key feelings: “tired,” “stressed” and “bored” [deleted period] during the school day. Marc Brackett, a researcher in the Yale University Department of Psychology and director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, warns that such negative feelings can influence young people’s attention, memory, decision making, school performance and social lives. The survey asked students this online question: “How do you currently feel in school?” Eight of the top 10 responses were negative; 39% of students wrote “tired,” 29% said “stressed” and 26% said “bored.”

Bullied Teens Face Roadblocks to Mental Health Services  – U.S. News

Nearly one-third of American teens are bullied, according to a new study, but fewer than a quarter of them get mental health help. Dr. Amira El Sherif, a pediatrician in Fayettville [check spelling], NC notes victims of bullying are at risk for problems such as anxiety, depression and self-harm. Researchers highlight numerous obstacles within schools, including inaction by educators, poor enforcement of investigation procedures, and inadequate follow-up and poor communication with parents. The study also pinpointed 28 barriers that prevent bullied students from accessing mental health services, including lack of adequate screening and counseling by health providers.

A Child Who Feels ‘Left Behind’ Can Still Get Ahead – NPR

There are more than 61 million “left-behind” kids in the poorest parts of China. One or both parents have moved to toil in factories, hoping to make enough money to pull the family out of poverty and into a better life. New study in China, looking at the so-called left behind children, finds that while these children face serious problems, they are not doomed to a dark future. But the lesson applies to any child living in less than ideal circumstances. Daphna Oyserman, a psychologist at the University of Southern California, found that the children needed to have not only a positive outlook on their future but also a plan to become what the study calls their “ideal selves.” In simpler terms, that means setting goals and figuring out how to reach them.

Why What You Learned in Preschool Is Crucial at Work– New York Times

Skills like cooperation, empathy and flexibility have become increasingly vital in modern day work. And the only occupations that have shown consistent wage growth since 2000 require both cognitive and social skills. Yet to prepare students for the change in the way we work, the skills that schools teach may need to change. These conclusions do not mean traditional education has become unnecessary, researchers say.  In fact, traditional school subjects are probably more necessary than ever to compete in the labor market. David Deming, associate professor of education and economics at Harvard University, notes the new middle-skill jobs combine technical and interpersonal expertise, like physical therapy or general contracting.

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When Girls Compulsively Text,Their Grades Suffer, Children Treated for Mental Health by Pediatricians, Kroger Tips Scales on Trans Health Care and more- In Case You Missed It– October 19, 2015

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Welcome back to In Case You Missed It (our weekly roundup of articles touching on psychology, health, mental health and social justice issues from multiple news and commentary websites). This week, we address the impact of when girls compulsively text, children treated for mental health by pediatricians, Kroger tipping scales on trans health care and more. 

APA Exclusive – When Girls Compulsively Text, Their Grades Suffer -Time

A new study by The Pew Research Center study published in the American Psychological Association’s Psychology of Popular Media Journal found when girls compulsively text, their grades suffer. They studied found that with 63% of teens reporting they send and receive an average of 167 texts per day while only 35% report socializing face-to-face outside of school. The findings highlight a gender disparity: while boys and girls both text at about the same rates, girls compulsively text about 20% more than boys. There also seems to be a connection between poor grades and compulsive texting that affects girls more strongly than boys. Kelly Lister-Landman, an assistant professor of psychology at Delaware County Community College notes that the study does not mean that all texting is bad. “texting can be a wonderful tool of communication.”.

One-third of children treated for mental health by pediatrician -United Press International

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that as of  2011 about 6.4 million U.S. children ages 4 to 17 had been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. A new study shows that than one-third of mental health care provided to children with ADHD or nay disorder comes from primary care physicians, rather than child psychiatrists. Dr. Jeanne Van Cleave, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, notes that “There just aren’t enough child psychiatrists in the United States to treat every child with a mental health condition,” These findings highlight as Van Cleave notes the need for collaboration and communication between primary care physicians and child psychiatrists to the deal with the sizable number of children needing mental health treatment.

Kroger Tips Scales on Trans Health Care -The Daily Beast

The Kroger Company, one of the largest private employers in the United States, will offer transgender health benefits starting January 2016 to employees. Several major American health care associations including the American Medical Association, the American Psychiatric Association, and the American Psychological Association have issued statements supporting transgender health care coverage.The Kroger Company’s insurance plan will provide coverage up to a $100,000 lifetime maximum for eligible employees and dependents. This will offer transgender-inclusive health insurance coverage and becoming a tipping point, for trans-inclusive health insurance, which is still out of reach for many of the estimated 700,000 transgender adults in the U.S. 

Pediatricians Rethink Screen Time Policy for Children -The Wall Street Journal

After more than 15 years, the American Academy of Pediatrics is starting the process of revising its ironclad guidelines for children and screens. Academy of Pediatrics had advised parents to avoid screen time completely for children under the age of 2, and to limit screen time to no more than two hours a day for children older than 2. Ari Brown, chair of the AAP committee that’s been investigating children’s media use, noted, “Technology moves faster than science can study it, so we are perpetually behind in our advice and our recommendations.”. A 2013 survey by Common Sense Media, in San Francisco, found that 38% of children under the age of 2 had used a mobile device. Dr. Brown noted that “The more screen media mimics live interactions, the more educationally valuable it may be.”

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Filed under: In Case You Missed It Tagged: advocacy, Children, children's mental health, culture